Binnabook: Africa Culture

Readers Stats

Search on Binnabook

Translate

Showing posts with label Africa Culture. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Africa Culture. Show all posts

119 Villages Abolish Osu Caste System Practice In Nsukka Enugu State

 The 119 villages in the nine autonomous communities in Nsukka town, Nsukka Local Government Area of Enugu State, Wednesday, formalised the eradication of Osu Caste system in their communities.



The decision which was taken by the monarchs, town unions and other traditional institutions in the communities in collaboration with the Initiative for the Eradication of Traditional and Cultural Stigmatization in our Society, IFETACSIOS, was capped up with an interdenominational prayer session cum declarations and ‘Isu Oho’ by the chief priests and ‘Akpuraruas’ from the three quarters which make up Nsukka town.


Speaking during the interdenominational prayer session at the St. John’s Primary School, Ugwuorie, Nsukka, the Catholic bishop of Nsukka Diocese, Most Rev. Godffrey Onah, condemned the reprehensive traditional practice.


Quoting Galatians 3:28, the clergy explained that there was no need for discriminatory practices amongst people created by God.


The bishop who was represented by the Cathedral Administrator, Rev Fr. Eugene Odo, also said “this is the first of its kind in Nsukka cultural zone. There cannot be development amidst strife and discrimination. The Osu caste system needs to be eradicted to enable all memebers of the society contribute their quota in moving the communities forward because we cannot make progress when we discriminate against ourselves,” the cleric said.


He also called for other communities within the Nsukka cultural zone to emulate Nsukka town by initiating steps towards ending harmful cultural practices that are anti people.


Speaking to journalists during the event, the President General of Nsukka Town Union, Chief Joseph Onyeke, while commending the nine autonomous communities in Nsukka town for the landmark achievement, said “By history, we cannot forget the efforts of our noble men and women like William Wilberforce, Mary Slessor who, about 200 years ago, volunteered their lives to make sure slave trade was abolished. Even though they achieved great height in securing legal freedom for the enslaved, some deprivations remained in practice till this day.


“In practice, discriminations have continued even in this part of the continent. They include denials of intermarriage, title-taking_Oha and Umuada, placement of Oho and Oduatu together and ascending to the height of ‘Onyeishi Aruah among others. The consequences of the above were restiveness and underdevelopment in all sectors of life.


“In Nsukka town, the crises of 1946-1955 regarding the discrimination practices worsened the matter, and ever since then, the problems were managed and never solved,” he said.


Also in his remarks, the traditional ruler of Ihe Nsukka Autonomous Community, HRH, Igwe George Asadu said , that Osu was a creation of humans and not God.


“The segregation lives here on earth and not in heaven. Even the Bible upholds all humans as equal before God,” he said.


He also said that with the eradication of Osu caste system, there would be hitch free intermarriage and equal economic rights which hitherto were not the case before now.


His counterpart of Owerre Nsukka Autonomous Community, HRH, Igwe Emeka Ugwu, said he was happy over the development, adding that he was the first monarch in Nsukka cultural zone to initiate the move towards the abolishment of the discriminatory practices.


In his contribution, the Visioner and Coordinator of IFETACSIOS, Nwada Stella Ogechukwu, while expressing her joy over the abolishment of the practice said “I take full cognizance of other communities that have abolished the caste system, but I call the Nsukka people the pace setters because you came together in strength, might and love to jettison the evil practice.


“I know the kind of efforts that go into achieving such a milestone. Your actions towards achieving this feat are commendable and worthy of emulation,” she said.


Earlier in his address, the chairman of the committee on Total Eradication of Discrimination between Ohu and Amu in Nsukka Town, Barr Peter Odo, described the development as a new dawn in the communities.


“After elaborate deliberations, it was unanimously agreed that the discriminatory practices between ‘Osu and Amu’ be totally eradicated and eliminated,” he announced.


He said that the committee set up to effect the abolishment came up with three solutions of “appeasement, compensation and reparation, adding that those who felt wronged and those whose forefathers may have also wronged others have fully forgiven one another.


Source: Vangaurd News

Today in History, On March 23, 1998, the President of U.S.A, Bill Clinton arrived in Ghana

 Today in History, On March 23, 1998, the President of U.S.A, Bill Clinton arrived in Ghana. His visit made him the first Sitting US president to ever visit the nation. His visit was part of a 12-day visit to 6 African countries and Ghana was the first African country he visited.

As the first United States president to visit Ghana, President Bill Clinton speaks to the people of Ghana about Africa’s growing appreciation for tolerance and human rights as well as improving U.S. ties with Ghana.


PHOTOS BELOW:













March 23, 1998: Remarks to the People of Ghana

Thank you. President and Mrs. Rawlings, honorable ministers, honorable members of the Council of State, honorable Members of Parliament, honorable members of the Judiciary, nananom [to the chiefs], and the people of Ghana. Mitsea mu. America fuo kyia mo [My greetings to you. Greetings from America]. Now you have shown me what akwaaba [welcome] really means. Thank you, thank you so much.


I am proud to be the first American President ever to visit Ghana and to go on to Uganda, Rwanda, South Africa, Botswana, and Senegal. It is a journey long overdue. America should have done it before, and I am proud to be on that journey. Thank you for welcoming me.


I want to listen and to learn. I want to build a future partnership between our two people, and I want to introduce the people of the United States, through my trip, to the new face of Africa. From Kampala to Cape Town, from Dakar to Dar-Es-Salaam, Africans are being stirred by new hopes for democracy and peace and prosperity.

Challenges remain, but they must be to all of you a call to action, not a cause for despair. You must draw strength from the past and energy from the promise of a new future. My dream for this trip is that together we might do the things so that, 100 years from now, your grandchildren and mine will look back and say this was the beginning of a new African renaissance.


With a new century coming into view, old patterns are fading away: The cold war is gone; colonialism is gone; apartheid is gone. Remnants of past troubles remain. But surely, there will come a time when everywhere reconciliation will replace recrimination. Now, nations and individuals finally are free to seek a newer world where democracy and peace and prosperity are not slogans but the essence of a new Africa.


Africa has changed so much in just 10 years. Dictatorship has been replaced so many places. Half of the 48 nations in sub-Saharan Africa choose their own governments, leading a new generation willing to learn from the past and imagine a future. Though democracy has not yet gained a permanent foothold even in most successful nations, there is everywhere a growing respect for tolerance, diversity, and elemental human rights. A decade ago, business was stifled. Now, Africans are embracing economic reform. Today from Ghana to Mozambique, from Cote d'Ivoire to Uganda, growing economies are fueling a transformation in Africa.


For all this promise, you and I know Africa is not free from peril: the genocide in Rwanda; civil wars in Sierra Leone, Liberia, both Congos; pariah states that export violence and terror; military dictatorship in Nigeria; and high levels of poverty, malnutrition, disease, illiteracy, and unemployment. To fulfill the vast promise of a new era, Africa must face these challenges. We must build classrooms and companies, increase the food supply and save the environment, and prevent disease before deadly epidemics break out.


The United States is ready to help you. First, my fellow Americans must leave behind the stereotypes that have warped our view and weakened our understanding of Africa. We need to come to know Africa as a place of new beginning and ancient wisdom from which, as my wife, our First Lady, said in her book, we have so much to learn. It is time for Americans to put a new Africa on our map.


Here in Independence Square, Ghana blazed the path of that new Africa. More than four decades ago, Kwame Nkrumah proposed what he called a "motion of destiny" as Ghana stepped forward as a free and independent nation. Today, Ghana again lights the way for Africa. Democracy is spreading. Business is growing. Trade and investment are rising. Ghana has the only African-owned company today on our New York Stock Exchange.


You have worked hard to preserve the peace in Africa and around the world—from Liberia to Lebanon, from Croatia to Cambodia. And you have given the world a statesman and peacemaker in Kofi Annan to lead the United Nations. The world admires your success. The United States admires your success. We see it taking root throughout the new Africa. And we stand ready to support it.


First, we want to work with Africa to nurture democracy, knowing it is never perfect or complete. We have learned in over 200 years that every day democracy must be defended and a more perfect union can always lie ahead. Democracy requires more than the insults and injustice and inequality that so many societies have known and America has known. Democracy requires human rights for everyone, everywhere, for men and women, for children and the elderly, for people of different cultures and tribes and backgrounds. A good society honors its entire family.


Second, democracy must have prosperity. Americans of both political parties want to increase trade and investment in Africa. We have an "African Growth and Opportunity Act" now before Congress. Both parties' leadership are supporting it. By opening markets and building businesses and creating jobs, we can help and strengthen each other. By supporting the education of your people, we can strengthen your future and help each other. For centuries, other nations exploited Africa's gold, Africa's diamonds, Africa's minerals. Now is the time for Africans to cultivate something more precious, the mind and heart of the people of Africa, through education.


Third, we must allow democracy and prosperity to take root without violence. We must work to resolve the war and genocide that still tear at the heart of Africa. We must help Africans to prevent future conflicts.

Here in Ghana, you have shown the world that different peoples can live together in harmony. You have proved that Africans of different countries can unite to help solve disputes in neighboring countries. Peace everywhere in Africa will give more free time and more money to the pressing needs of our children's future. The killing must stop if a new future is to begin.


Fourth and finally, for peace and prosperity and democracy to prevail, you must protect your magnificent natural domain. Africa is mankind's first home. We all came out of Africa. We must preserve the magnificent natural environment that is left. We must manage the water and forest. We must learn to live in harmony with other species. You must learn how to fight drought and famine and global warming. And we must share with you the technology that will enable you to preserve your environment and provide more economic opportunity to your people.



America has good reason to work with Africa: 30 million Americans, more than one in ten, proudly trace their heritage here. The first Peace Corps volunteers from America came to Ghana over 35 years ago; over 57,000 have served in Africa since then. Through blood ties and common endeavors, we know we share the same hopes and dreams to provide for ourselves and our children, to live in peace and worship freely, to build a better life than our parents knew and pass a brighter future on to our children. America needs Africa, America needs Ghana as a partner in the fight for a better future.

So many of our problems do not stop at any nation's border, international crime and terrorism and drug trafficking, the degradation of the environment, the spread of diseases like AIDS and malaria, and so many of our opportunities cannot stop at a nation's border. We need partners to deepen the meaning of democracy in America, in Africa, and throughout the world. We need partners to build prosperity. We need partners to live in peace. We will not build this new partnership overnight, but perseverance creates its own reward.


An Ashanti proverb tells us that by coming and going, a bird builds its nest. We will come and go with you and do all we can as you build the new Africa, a work that must begin here in Africa, not with aid or trade, though they are important, but first with ordinary citizens, especially the young people in this audience today. You must feel the winds of freedom blowing at your back, pushing you onward to a brighter future.

There are roughly 700 days left until the end of this century and the beginning of a new millennium. There are roughly 700 million Africans in sub-Saharan Africa. Every day and every individual is a precious opportunity. We do not have a moment to lose, and we do not have a person to lose.

I ask you, my friends, to let me indulge a moment of our shared history in closing. In 1957 our great civil rights leader, Martin Luther King, came to Accra to help represent our country as Ghana celebrated its independence. He was deeply moved by the birth of your nation.


Six years later, on the day after W.E.B. Du Bois died here in Ghana in 1963, Dr. King spoke to an enormous gathering like this in Washington. He said these simple words: "I have a dream, a dream that all Americans might live free and equal as brothers and sisters." His dream became the dream of our Nation and changed us in ways we could never have imagined. We are hardly finished, but we have traveled a long way on the wings of that dream.

Dr. Du Bois, a towering African-American intellectual, died here as a citizen of Ghana and a friend of Kwame Nkrumah. He once wrote, "The habit of democracy must be to encircle the Earth." Let us together resolve to complete the circle of democracy, to dream the dream that all people on the entire Earth will be free and equal, to begin a new century with that commitment to freedom and justice for all, to redeem the promise inscribed right here on Independence Arch. Let us find a future here in Africa, the cradle of humanity.

Medase. America dase [I thank you. America thanks you]. Thank you, and God bless you.

PUBLISHER BINNABOOK


In the Other News 

The leader of the pan-Yoruba socio-political organisation, Afenifere, Chief Ayo Adebanjo, says the President, Major General Muhammadu Buhari (retd.), won’t hand over power to the National Leader of the All Progressives Congress, Bola Tinubu.

You can Also Read: Tinubu is Deceiving Himself Buhari will not Handover power to him in 2023-Yoruba Leader Chief Ayo Adebanjo Said

President Muhammadu Buhari met behind closed doors with President Patrice Talon of Benin Republic at the State House, Abuja.

 


President Muhammadu Buhari on Tuesday met behind closed doors with President Patrice Talon of Benin Republic at the State House, Abuja.


The News Agency of Nigeria (NAN) reports that the Beninese leader, who arrived at the forecourt of the presidential villa at 11.09 a.m., was received by Mr Buhari.


The agenda of the meeting between the two leaders, who immediately went into a closed-door meeting, was unknown to journalists, Igbere TV reports.



NAN, however, gathered that Mr Talon, who last met with the Nigerian leader in June 2019, was in the villa to thank Mr Buhari for ordering the re-opening of Nigerian borders in December 2020.


Mr Buhari had in August 2019 ordered closure of Nigeria’s land borders to check smuggling of rice and other foodstuff as well as small arms and light weapons.


The president and the visiting Beninese leader are also expected to discuss security and bilateral matters as well as other sub-regional issues.

Goodluck Jonathan: We Are In Trouble, Nigeria’s Unity Questionable



Former President of Nigeria, Goodluck Jonathan, has said the unity of Nigeria is questionable.


Jonathan stated this while speaking during an exclusive command performance by the Port-Harcourt Male Ensemble International tagged ‘Peace for All Nations’ at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Abuja.


He stated that Nigerian youths sometimes engaged in all kinds of confrontation, recalling his conversation with one of his friends.


“And I was discussing with somebody, one of my friends and I said look, in Nigeria, they appear not to even have a national youth body. Because in most cases, the regional youth bodies are stronger than the national youth body.


“Ordinarily, the national youth body is supposed to be stronger than the regional youth body. If you go to my state, Bayelsa state for example, if I am a national member of the Nigerian Youth Council, the IYC, Ijaw Youth Council, feels that they are your boss.


“If you go to the Southwest and to the North, the Arewa Youth Group, they feel they are superior to the national youth body.


“If you go to the Southwest, the same thing. If you go to the Southeast, the same thing. That shows clearly that as a nation, we are in trouble. The unity of the country is questionable,” Jonathan said.

The lovely Nigerian city in Akwa Ibom State "Ikot Ekpene"

 Ikot ekpene is actually a great city to live in Nigeria, it's very affordable and you avoid the high rent in Uyo the capital city while you are 20 mins drive from uyo in a dualized autobahn.


Ikot ekpene is a great place for you adults just starting live, but you must have entrepreneurial drive,  there are no jobs like every where else in Nigeria.


Ikot ekpene has the federal government college, state polytechnic , and the federal poly ukana is a stone throw, it also has the Ritman University ikot ekpene, for those who are school age.


A city park, for picnics and family hangout, a numbers of relaxation spots and Raffia Arts is the major handwork of the people of this area.


Raffia arts made in ikot ekpene is famous worldwide, even the colonialists have been known to dabble in arts from this area, the wooden mask carved in Ikot ekpene is also very famous.


The Oil palm business and rubber business is at it peak here .


Ikot ekpene is a much older city than Uyo, it was the first Experimental Local government in British west Africa, ie this is where the British started the idea of local government administration in west Africa. Ikot ekpene has lots of colonial architecture that will mesmerize you, especially the churches.










four point hotel 












View of Four Point Hotel Ikot Ekpene


St. ANNE CATHOLIC cathedral ikot Ekpene.

An Architectural masterpiece.

A sight worth visiting, if you are interested in old European architecture.

This is just one of several old colonial buildings in ikot Ekpene.

The first African catholic cardinal in Nigeria and West African, cardinal Dominic Ekandem was the bishop of Ikot Ekpene.

Hence lots of catholic relics in this city.

St. ANNE CATHOLIC cathedral ikot Ekpene.





If you are young an just starting life and looking for a place with good roads, good schools, low crime rate, affordable city and a perfect place to raise kids,


Look no further Ikot Ekpene is the place for you. Its 15mins. From Uyo Akwa ibom state capital with well articulated road networks that will mesmerize you.


Its 70mins from Victor attah international airport.


And very close to Aba and umuahia though the road to aba and umuahia are terrible.
Ikot ekpene Stadium 

Writer :Obinna Pascal Amajuoyi
Publisher Binnabook Magazine

Cuba Adopts Cryptocurrency as Part of Communist Party Agenda

 Cryptocurrency is now officially part of the Communist Party agenda in Cuba. Over the weekend, Cuba’s government adopted a proposal to incl...

BINNABOOK BLOG POSTS


BINNAPARLOUR BLOG POST


MOST READ POST


COPYRIGHT: All rights reserved. This material and any other material on this platform may not be reproduced, published, written in full or in part, without written permission from BINNABOOK PUBLISHERS.But you can share through the social Media